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First rifle suggestions

Discussion in 'Rifle & Shotgun Discussion' started by Troy Boerner, Feb 22, 2021.

  1. Troy Boerner

    Troy Boerner Marksman

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    Looking to get my very first rifle. I am looking for a long range (about 500 yards) bolt action repeater. I want to have around a 1 to 1.5 MOA accuracy. Wooden preference. Budget will be about $600 or less. Don't really have a preference on ammo cause I dont know what ill be getting. Not interested in the "scary black guns" but something with a WWI or WWII look. 4 or 5 round capacity.

    Okay so that is what I would like ... But that is going off limited knowledge of rifles. There maybe more questions that need to have answers from me before y'all are able to suggest some for me too look at getting. So let's get me educated.
     
  2. thor447

    thor447 Sharpshooter

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    Welcome to OSA. You've come to the right place asking for suggestions on rifles. I'm sure they'll be no shortage of folks offering advice for you.

    The good news is that off the shelf rifles nowadays are capable of 1 MOA accuracy right out of the box. Although it's a more traditional rifle, and not necessarily a WWI or WWII look, you'd be hard pressed to find a better shooting rifle, for the money, than just a regular Savage or Ruger hunting rifle. These things can shoot 1 MOA out of the box. You might take a look at the Savage Axis XP, or perhaps the Ruger American rifles. If you are wanting to shoot out to 500 yards, I can guarantee you that once you hit 500, you'll want to go further! Try reading up on the.308 and 6.5 Creedmoor cartridges and see what works best for you.
     
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  3. rswink

    rswink Sharpshooter

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    Okay, 2nd try, 1st got sidetracked on a statement.

    So, I agree with the Savage and Ruger suggestions above. Also agree with 308 vs 6.5CM. But, remember 308 is also a military round for a lot of years. But, so was 30-06.

    Might want to include Mossberg, my wife likes her Patriot in 243.

    But, right now this request is going to be difficult with the shortages going on. Try driving South down to Norman and visit Academy or Atwood's. Or, head North into the city and hit up H&H, Bass Pro, Cabela's, or any of their Academy stores. Head west over to Big Boys, they usually have a good selection.

    1st though, I would pick a caliber(s) you want that fill the intended role.

    2nd I would build a list of models that I like the looks of that come in the chosen caliber that will keep up with that role.

    3rd I would start shopping from that list.

    Since I have been known to skip that 3 step process I have acquired and disposed of several inappropriate rifles for my purpose

    Sent from my Pixel 4 using Tapatalk
     
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  4. doug1949

    doug1949 Marksman

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    Caliber is important and depends on what you will use the rifle for. Hunting? What kind of game! Target Cost and shooting? What kind of competitions! Cost and availability of ammo is a consideration.
     
  5. Profreedomokie

    Profreedomokie Sharpshooter

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    Availability of ammo is a hard thing to judge. Every time we get an antigun prez thing go crazy. Caliber wouldn't be as big a deal if you plan on getting into reloading, even with some reloading supplies getting harder to find. If you want to shoot out to 500 yds. calibers as small as the 5.56mm will do that. I've been told that the 5.56mm wins most matches at Camp Perry out to 600 yds. The 6.5 Creedmoor is the caliber of the day. I've shot out to 800 yds. with a .308 but, there are many calibers that shoot flatter. I'm a car guy also. I've got a little Fiat 500 Sport that I've modified the crap out of. I'm waiting on a limited slip differential to be here from England in May. I run the Texas foothills every year with a large group of Fiat owners. Welcome aboard !
     
  6. HoLeChit

    HoLeChit Semper Fidelis

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    I’ll echo what everyone here has said, most of your budget rifles offer accuracy as good or better than what you’re wanting. I’ll also suggest a Howa. They’re great, and pretty affordable too. What are you wanting to use this rifle for? Just learning and going to the range? Do you have anything you want to hunt with it? Do you have any previous experience with firearms or rifles specifically?

    also, at your price point you’ll be really hard up trying to find a rifle with a wooden stock, at least new. But you can always buy a wooden stock and replace the synthetic one, piece of cake.


    My personal opinion: I started with a 22LR rifle as my first. I highly suggest doing the same. I even did so during a big ammo scarcity deal, but I could find/afford enough 22 that I could still shoot it plenty until things calmed down. You can get a basic Henry 22 lever action with a wood stock, a Savage bolt action 22, Ruger American rimfire, Ruger 10/22 semi auto(there’s one in the classifieds right now with a walnut stock), heck, even a used CZ 455 or 457 for the price you’re talking.

    Purchasing a rimfire rifles as your first allows you to practice the fundamentals of rifle marksmanship without dealing with recoil, noise, or the cost of ammo. For the same price you’re gonna pay for 40 rounds of 308/30-06 you could buy a brick of 500 22lr rounds. That’s a whole lot of practice for a whole lot less money. This is just my opinion though, something to consider.

    https://www.chuckhawks.com/first_rifle.htm

    https://www.chuckhawks.com/first_big_game_rifle.htm
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2021
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  7. need1more

    need1more Marksman

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    The glass you put on it will eat a chunk of the budget. With mine the rifle was the cheapest component.
     
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  8. Troy Boerner

    Troy Boerner Marksman

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    My budget is for the gun not the glass
     
  9. sklfco

    sklfco Sharpshooter

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    An inexpensive optic that will not repeatably return to its set zero point will make your experiences very frustrating. Please don’t take that as more expensive is better.
     
  10. Jcann

    Jcann Sharpshooter

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    Your question makes it very difficult to answer other than keeping the cost under $600. Is the purpose of this budget rifle for target shooting only or do you plan to hunt with it as well? Is 500 yards the furthest you plan to shoot? Will you desire to modify the rifle (stock, trigger, barrel, muzzle brake, etc) as funds become available? Are you recoil sensitive? Do you reload or will this rifle be fed store bought ammo only?

    Long range is generally relative to the chambering one is shooting. Long range for someone shooting a 22lr is much shorter than for someone shooting a center fire cartridge. If you plan on using this rifle for target shooting only and 500 yards is the maximum you're going to shoot, I would run with a 223. If you plan to push the distance further...say out to 1,300-1500 yards I would run with a 6 or 6.5mm Creedmoor/260 Remington. Some will suggest a 308 due to its vast amount of ammo choices and it is a fine long range/hunting cartridge but it is handicapped when compared to the 6/6.5mm chamberings at distance shooting.

    Rifles, take your pick. Savage Axis, Ruger American, Howa 1500, Tikka T3 Lite or Superlite all offer budget friendly rifles. But, not all budget friendly rifles are the same. So do your homework and pick what meets your current and future needs.

    Personally, I wouldn't pick a Savage. I don't like the Accu Trigger and I detest the action. Although it is a fine shooting rifle with after market support. My son shoots a Savage 10 Predator Max 1 and it has performed very well shooting long range.

    I don't have field knowledge of the Ruger or Howa so I can't comment on them but many shooters are pleased with their purchase. I know Howa has a 1moa guarantee.

    My training rifle is a Tikka T3 CTR chambered in 260 Rem. It shoots sub moa with my reloads (I've never shot factory ammo in it). Tikka's also have an moa accuracy guarantee. Tikka makes a T3 Superlite and although discontinued you can find NIB "lite" models. Tikkas have a very smooth action and a fine adjustable factory trigger. You can even adjust this trigger further with a Yo Dave trigger spring for about $10. With this spring you can safely bring the pull weight to 1lb or lower (mine is +/-1.5lbs). With the Superlite model you can change the grip angle and fore end width (items purchased separately thru Tikka).

    Although all of the above mentioned rifles would suit your stated needs I wouldn't consider any of them to be long range rifles in the truest sense. They are more suited to hunting with the occasional long range shot(s). Recoil management is important to shooting long range and a lite rifle is difficult to manage. Most who shoot long range will want a heavier rifle, stiffer stock, aftermarket barrel with threaded muzzle. Neither of the above mentioned rifles fall into this but, can be modified later if desired.

    Hope this helps
     
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