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This is new to me...

Discussion in 'Rifle & Shotgun Discussion' started by PanhandleGlocker, Apr 12, 2021.

  1. PanhandleGlocker

    PanhandleGlocker Sharpshooter

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    Didn’t know there was a 32 Gauge. I guess there’s a 24 Gauge too.... have I been that blind to this for so many years???

    51185FE5-D54B-44A0-9222-35D853F6E9CA.png
     
  2. MacFromOK

    MacFromOK Sharpshooter

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    If that's true, you're not alone... :shocked:
     
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  3. MilitantBEEMER

    MilitantBEEMER Sharpshooter

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    I learned of it thanks to this post....
     
  4. Hodrod

    Hodrod Sharpshooter

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    It's news to me...I'm 71 and was under the impression that I knew everything about shotguns and their ammo....guess I was wrong...
     
  5. PanhandleGlocker

    PanhandleGlocker Sharpshooter

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    Quick search and it seems that it’s for small birds meant for taxidermy.

    big deal in Europe. Here not so much.
     
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  6. bluegrassZ71

    bluegrassZ71 Sharpshooter

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    News to me as well. Same payload as the 410...I wonder if it patterns differently.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
     
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  7. Okie4570

    Okie4570 Sharpshooter

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    I've seen a couple of boxes of shells in person one time, and it was with the only 32g firearm I've ever seen, and it was an Italian made O/U. I've looked over the years for one for sale and have never found one.
     
  8. dennishoddy

    dennishoddy Sharpshooter

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    First time for me as well, but I did some research.

    The 32 Gauge Shotgun Shell
    Thus, the 32 is a very, very small shotgun shell without a great deal of impact. It was originally designed by American manufacturers in the 1870s. By the 1930s, it had largely fallen off of the map. Because of its popularity in Europe and Russia, it continues to hang on. And while brass and plastic shells can be found, cardboard is generally the default for this shell. Most are 2.5” shells, but they do go up to as long as three inches.

    One of the reasons why the 32 gauge was never able to make a decent inroad into the American market (though it continues to have modest sales in Europe and South America) is that it’s barely any different from a 28 gauge – a mere twenty-four thousandths of an inch smaller in the bore diameter. Compare that to the difference between the 28 and the 20 gauge: sixty-five thousandths of an inch. The market could easily have preferred the 32 to the 28 and the .410, but it didn’t. And now the 32 has a very limited market, both domestically and internationally.

    This means that ammunition can be very hard to come by. For the most part, you’re not going to find ammo for a 32 gauge shotgun at your local sporting goods store, big box or otherwise. Even when you do find 32 gauge shotgun shells, they’re not going to be cheap, due to the general scarcity of the product. What’s more, reloading components can be hard to come by.

    But, while similar to the 410 in many ways, those who have used the 32 gauge sing its praises and tout its superiority over the more common round. Some of the features touted by the partisans of 32 gauge include a more efficient shot column and superior wad designs. And for some shooters, there’s just the kick out of owning a weapon in every conceivable chambering – the more unusual the better.

    As Whittier Daily News reporter Jim Matthews once put it, “It’s not about practical, it’s about fun.” He compares owning a 32 gauge shotgun to being the only person on the block driving a ‘63 Mustang. Is this the most practical choice for a means of transportation? Absolutely not. But is it cool? Anyone who says otherwise is obviously lying. This puts the 32 gauge in the same family as the 28 gauge and 14 gauge, but not quite the 16 gauge – which is unusual, but not as downright exotic as the other rounds. It’s a collectors item and those aren’t for everyone. But if you have the means and the interest, you’ll probably have a lot of fun.

    The 32 Gauge Shotgun Shell Today
    While over the years 32 gauge guns have been made by American Arms, Iver Johnson, Winchester, Remington and others – 32 gauge remains common throughout Europe to this day, with ammo still available from Fiocchi. In fact, rumor has it that quite a few 32 gauge shotguns made their way back to the States at the end of WWII. Since GIs were allowed to send a foot locker home (packed with just about anything due to poor inspections), many were able to return with guns from Nazi stockpiles that were confiscated from German citizens. These guns, known to be fine-crafted and some chambered for the 32, can be of great value if in good condition.

    Beyond its lack of availability and the historical value, what draws shooters to the 32 gauge? Efficiency seems to be the biggest benefit, with novelty shooters raving about efficient shot columns and stellar wad designs. But being barely smaller than a 28 gauge, the 32 never differentiated itself enough to stay relevant in the world of firearms.

    If you’re looking for a shotgun that doubles as a conversation piece, the 32 gauge will get fellow shooters talking. This rare find is a collector’s dream, and also a comparable shot to the 28 gauge or .410.
     
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  9. OKNewshawk

    OKNewshawk Sharpshooter

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    Considering the Ford Mustang wasn't introduced until April 17th, 1964, I'd say that you'd be the only person in the world, not your block, to be driving a 1963 Mustang--and I'd be suspicious of it.
     
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  10. dlbleak

    dlbleak Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Had one in my Ammo collection that I gave to @cdschoonie a few years ago.
    There was a 24 gauge shell too
     
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