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Random stuff you have made

Discussion in 'Photo Album' started by gfercaks33, Apr 17, 2016.

  1. Perplexed

    Perplexed Sharpshooter

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    Very nice! Looks like you used a router sled while working on the slab?
     
  2. Shadowrider

    Shadowrider Sharpshooter

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  3. Shoot Summ

    Shoot Summ Sharpshooter

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    The slab provider kiln dries them, and surfaces them with a CNC router.

    This one made a few trips through my drum sander to get the CNC tear out off.

    i have a smaller sled, it’s not fun to surface a large slab manually.
     
  4. Perplexed

    Perplexed Sharpshooter

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    I hear you about surfacing larger slabs. I used a router sled on a table top 30” x 60”, and it was a chore. I splurged on a 20” planer to do future river pours, putting each part through the planer before the pour. Makes it a heck of a lot easier and faster.
     
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  5. Shoot Summ

    Shoot Summ Sharpshooter

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    Thanks, I tried to add just a little interest to the epoxy with some gold and copper, but not so much that it was gaudy. The finish took a lot of testing, this is essentially end grain so no matter what you use it will darken, but some of them made the growth rings indistinguishable. I ended up using Rubio Monocoat, best way to describe it is a catalyzed oil, I literally buffed the piece with a buffer and wool pad when it had set, gives it a nice sheen I think.
     
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  6. Shoot Summ

    Shoot Summ Sharpshooter

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    This is the size that I can tolerate, this is a cottonwood chunk from Los Poblanos farm in Albuquerque. My Daughter makes "prints" from wood cookies, part of the process is flattening the wood, and sanding it smooth before she does the rest of the printing prep.

    IMG_3427.jpg IMG_3442.jpg IMG_3448.jpg

    One of my Daughter's prints, not from this piece of wood.

    IMG_3755.JPG
     
  7. crrcboatz

    crrcboatz Sharpshooter

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    Wow love this kind of work!
     
  8. Perplexed

    Perplexed Sharpshooter

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    Nice that you and your daughter have kindred hobbies!
     
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  9. SHOTGUN12

    SHOTGUN12 Sharpshooter

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  10. Perplexed

    Perplexed Sharpshooter

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    Finally finished this table for my foyer. The back splash is reclaimed barn wood, mostly oak, and I’ll hang items on it that you might find in a work shop in the barn. Old tools, a vintage hand-pumped mini fire extinguisher, a clock from the late 1930s to early 1940s, and a farm calendar from 1945. The light switch is a turn-of-the-century rotary switch that came out of a stock of military surplus parts, and was sealed in VCI paper dated 1965. Wonder if the military was still installing these rotary switches half a century later?? The top is made of sycamore from my neighbor’s tree, the frame is 3/4” cast iron pipe, and the body of the cabinet is 1/2” and 3/4” Baltic birch plywood. The trim is alder, and the sliding doors are made of basswood which makes at least five species of wood used in this project. I used a Lichtenberg burner to impart the squiggly lines on the doors, and I filled them with metallic copper powder from my powder coating supplies, and I melted the powder with a heat gun. Unfortunately, you have to get up close to see the sparkle. I turned and aged a small pair of brass knobs for the doors. The light shades came out of a stash of parts reclaimed from a gas station, so I’m told. They certainly have the patina of age. Overall, I’m pleased with how the table turned out...

    FE19CC2B-EEA3-47C6-945E-72B90EE62818.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2021

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