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Stock refinishing thread: BLO vs PTO vs Tung Oil Finish

Discussion in 'Military Surplus' started by coolhandluke, Jan 26, 2016.

  1. jbrentd

    jbrentd Sharpshooter

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    @coolhandluke Yeah I considered replying in that thread originally. Thanks

    So, seeing as I don't already have a supply of pine tar, what are your thoughts on the Tom's products? They sell just pine tar in smaller quantities and their pine tar/beeswax mix as well.
     
  2. coolhandluke

    coolhandluke Sharpshooter

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    I don't believe that Tom Hinds offers any 100% pine tar. The pine tar mix on his website is described as "Tom's Pine Tar Mix made with Auson's Swedish Pine tar ONLY" but it actually also contains BLO and a small amount of beeswax in order to keep it in a solid state. Tom has said in the past that the hazmat shipping fees are too expensive to make it viable for him to offer pure pine tar for sale. I have tried the stuff and IMHO Tom's Pine Tar mix is best for easy touch ups of scratches etc. The small amount of beeswax in the mixture prevents it from penetrating the grain as well as pure pine tar and turpentine does. Unless you have a highly figured piece of wood, the results aren't that impressive. It also leaves a waxy coating on the wood like his other 1/3 mixes and I am honestly not a fan of the look or feel.

    Auson pine tar can be purchased on Amazon so it's not nearly as hard to locate as it used to be. When I first started using the stuff I had to obtain it from individuals who were ordering it from Sweden.

    https://www.amazon.com/Imprex-Pine-...qid=1475330293&sr=8-3&keywords=auson+pine+tar

    You can also use equine pine tar although most brands are greenish in color, unpleasant smelling, and do not dry properly. Bat pine tar would likely be a much better substitute, but I have honestly never attempted using it.
     
  3. jbrentd

    jbrentd Sharpshooter

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    Yes, I was incorrect on Tom selling pure pine tar. Could one cut the Tom's Pine Tar with turpentine? Would that dilute the wax enough to allow it to penetrate?

    So you used the Auson "Imprex" Pine Tar? I see they also sell a couple other pine tar products, "Genuine" and "Kihl Burn". I just wish they sold it in smaller amounts. I'll never use 1/10th of that in my lifetime, unless I found other uses for it.

    I have posted similar questions on Gunboards. The one suggestion I received so far was to use a Potassium Permanganate method. I definitely don't want to start a debate over there on pine tar vs Kiväärintukkiöljy (or Rifle Stock Oil), as those threads can go on for years.


    Have you ever tried or have any thoughts on that method? I guess one can easy apply too much of the PP and the stock could turn almost black.
     
  4. coolhandluke

    coolhandluke Sharpshooter

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    According to Terence Lapin, potassium permanganate was used as part of the finishing process as early as the late 1930's. I can't verify if this is actually correct, but he would be referring to the Finnish stocks that are darker in appearance. I might be hesitant to use PP without lots of testing beforehand as I've seen nearly black and even purple colored wood that's treated with the stuff. That being said, it is a popular choice for antique long rifle builders that want to accent burl and figuring in maple stocks. For me, the pine tar is easier as I know the exact results that I am going to get with it. If I remember correctly, the Auson product that I have used is the "genuine" version, but either should work fine. If you happen to be a member on Surplus Rifle Forum, there is an individual that will send you a free sample tube of the Auson pine tar if he currently has any on hand. His tubes will normally finish two stocks.

    IMO the conundrum with this stock is going to be how to finish it without stripping any of the remaining patina that it currently has. Without stripping it down to bare wood, pine tar and even more certainly Tom's Pine Tar mix (even dilluted) is not going to penetrate the surface like it needs to. It may not be what you want to hear, but I don't advise using the Tom's mix as the small amount of wax is going to give you issues. I am honestly not a fan of wax on surplus stocks. It may provide an appearance that looks fine in photos, but it feels and looks wrong in person.

    I honestly would hate to see the stock further stripped as well. At this point it at least has a few scars and a small amount of patina that gives it some age. It might be worth trying to experiment with a mix of powdered dyes and linseed oil to see if you can come up with something close to the SA oil. I believe that Kiväärintukkiöljy is basically just oil, a dying / coloring agent, a small amount of varnish, and driers. As for the pine tar debate...I honestly don't think the Finns ever used straight pine tar, or for that matter, beeswax as a stock finish. The only slight possibility is that wood pitch (or tar) was possibly used as one of the ingredients an a mutli-ingredient mixture similar to the SA oil.
     

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